Profiles in "Evolutionary Anthropology" Expertise Area

  • Reed's research uses community ecology of primates and mammals to understand biogeography, community structure, and the habitats of fossil hominins.
  • Nash's areas of focus is in physical anthropology: primate social behavior and ecology, Galagos and the role of gum.
  • Stone's specialization and main area of interest is anthropological genetics. Her current research focuses on population history and understanding how humans and the great apes have adapted to their environments.
  • Barton is a complex systems scientist who combines anthropology, archaeology, earth science, and information technologies to study long-term dynamics and interactions of people and landscapes in the Anthropocene.
  • Schwartz is interested in the evolutionary history of primate and human growth, development, and life history as evidenced in fossilized tissues, in particular developing teeth.
  • Hill began his education in molecular genetics but switched to evolutionary anthropology in 1980. He has held faculty positions at Emory University, University of Michigan, University of New Mexico, and A.S.U
  • Johanson is the Founding Director of the Institute of Human Origins. He has written, among other books, the widely read "Lucy: The Beginnings of Humankind" (with Maitland Edey), 1991.
  • Kimbel was a research associate of the Institute of Human Origins. He conducts field, laboratory and theoretical research in paleoanthropology, with a primary focus on Plio-Pleistocene hominid evolution in Africa.
  • Campisano researches the environmental context of hominid evolution and is especially interested in characterizing ancient landscapes and their change across space and time.
  • Penkrot teaches human anatomy and physiology, and general biology. Her doctorate is in functional anatomy and evolution from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.